Four Things I’ve Liked This Week

Four Things I’ve Liked This Week

Here we have a Buzzfeed-esque list of “4 Things” which have caught my eye of late: things which made me laugh, made me (fleetingly, before I remember the weather, #8monthsofsnoweachyear) want to emigrate to Canada, made me mentally crown a member of the British Royal family this week’s #HeforShe champion and made me recall an early brush with a culture very, very different from my own.

Meme riposte to can anyone stop HillaryFirstly,  this meme response to a Time magazine cover from 2014 made me laugh.

“Can Anyone Stop Hillary?”  was the question in a televised debate: and here we have the great reply.

 

Justin Trudeau UN WomenIn my 2015 round up of people and stuff I loved, I referenced the then newly minted Canadian leader Justin Trudeau as a hero for saying, in a very matter of fact way “Because it’s 2015 …” when asked why he had a 50/50 gender split in his cabinet. He’s gone on to consolidate his feminist credentials; Fortune magazine did a nice round up of five times that he’s been a feminist hero and I especially like this quote, from JT’s recent editorial in the Globe and Mail:

“Feminism is about equal rights and opportunities for men and women, about everyone having the same choices without facing discrimination based on gender. Equality is not a threat, it is an opportunity.”

So yes please Mr Trudeau, do please keep saying you’re a feminist.

Prince Harry on feminismAnother, perhaps unlikely, bloke was outed as a gender champion last week when Prince Harry visited Nepal and spoke in support of gender equality at the Girl Summit. I would love to see him do more of this type of work – I think he has huge influence and reach and,  removed from the burden of pressure to be a future monarch,  he could really build his own portfolio and platform in support of women, girls and education.

“There are way too many obstacles between girls and the opportunities they deserve,” the 31-year-old prince told the crowd [at the Summit]. “We need to acknowledge that so many countries and cultures are failing to protect the opportunities of young women and girls in the way they do for boys,” he continued.

The royal, who admitted he has not spoken out on the challenges of young girls in the past, embraced the opportunity and encouraged others to do the same.

“We won’t unlock these opportunities for young women and girls unless we can change the mindset of every family and community. To achieve this, it cannot just be women who speak up for girls,” he said.

Finally, a recent story in The Observer took me back in time and reminded me of my first foray into volunteer work when I was still at school. We currently hear so much about refugees from Syria but the paper went to catch up with a number of Vietnamese refugees, who found themselves in the UK in the early 1980s after their rescue from terrifying boat journeys (hence being referred to in tabloid terms as “the boat people”) and subsequent re-homing in Peterborough.  At the time,  the Cambridgeshire city was dubbed a ‘new town’ and was in the throes of expansion and development; businesses were lured there with cut price offices and rates and new housing estates seemed to spring up almost overnight.  The then Mayor made some of these new properties available to a number of Vietnamese families and I came to know them when I spent two afternoons a week with them as part of my volunteer work (in lieu of playing hockey!) at school.

The programme was nominally about teaching the adults English,  but in reality it became much more about learning life skills and how their new life and society actually worked. So whilst we did spend time sitting in their kitchens doing English lessons together (numbers, colours, names, food and drink, and putting stickers up on items around the house – door, chair, TV, sink, fridge) we also went out and about together so that my new friends could learn how to use public transport,  how to use the public library, what to do in a shop (how to queue, for example … I remember this causing much puzzlement), how to sit in a café and order from the waitress.

I did this for nearly two years before I left Peterborough to go away to university and I loved it – and I know that I learned as much from my new friends as they ever learned from me, not least the capacity to look at life through a different lens and see things from another point of view. It was wonderful to read the article and learn about how the families settled and became successful; there is one very successful young woman featured in the article and I wonder if I met her when she was a child.

Weekly round up: anyone for tennis?

Weekly round up: anyone for tennis?

tennis money shutterstockAs Adele would say, hello. Ahead of a long (in the UK, at least) weekend, here’s my round up of gender related news, plus a recommendation for a novel.

There’s still lots of noise around the gender pay gap. And I feel that my prediction earlier this year that it’s THE human capital news story of 2016 is very much the case. The Huffington Post askedjust how persistent is the gender pay gap? Apparently, even companies that practice “salary transparency” – making all employees’ salaries publicly available – may end up paying men more than women.  And a report by the UK Women and Equalities Select Committee said the government has failed to close the pay gap and called for action on what it dubbed the ‘motherhood penalty’.

Meanwhile, anyone for tennis? The sporting pay gap story of the week played out in a series of comments, resignations and backtracks. Firstly, Indian Wells Tennis Garden CEO Raymond Moore’s allegation that female tennis players “ride on [the] coattails of the men” hit the tennis world like a bombshell, prompting his subsequent resignation. While Serena Williams called his statements “mistaken and very, very, very inaccurate,” Novak Djokovic firstly took the opposite view, saying he believes there is data to support the notion that men bring in more fans, swiftly followed by HIS backtrack,  claiming he had been misunderstood and that it wasn’t his “intention” to cause offence (thus proving my oft-repeated point that it’s never about intent but always about impact). Game, set and match to Serena Williams and Andy Murray, I think,  who both come out of this debate with dignity and gender equity support intact and consistent.

In US politics, The New York Times reported on how white men are pushing back on supporting Hillary Clinton, whilst Donald Trump’s “problem with women” may cost him the Republican nomination (and that would be a real definition of soft power,  if it happens).

“To win the White House Donald Trump will have to accomplish one of the great political seductions of all time. Having insulted the women of America as bimbos, fat pigs, dogs, slobs and disgusting animals, he will have to persuade them to vote for him.”

(I can’t actually bear to illustrate this story with a relevant image,  so please use your imagination, if you can stand to do so.)

Thanks to ELLE’s Hannah Swerling sharing the details of it with us at Soho House last week,  I finally caught up with this New York magazine story on why and how young single, female voters hold the power in 2016 – why the shape of marriage and family life is changing and how the practicalities of female life independent of marriage give rise to US demands for pay equity, paid family leave, a higher minimum wage and broadly accessible reproductive rights; many of these are issues that have, for years, been considered too risky to be central to mainstream Democratic conversation, yet they are policies today supported by both Democratic candidates for president.

Last week, Sheryl Sandberg celebrated the two year anniversary of the release of the Lean In Collection on Getty Images, a library of thousands of creative images devoted to changing the portrayal of women and girls in media and advertising. In the past year, searches for “woman entrepreneur” have increased by 402% on Getty’s website — and searches for “empowered women” increased by 772%. As Sandberg shared on Facebook, “We also need to broaden the images we see of men, and there are signs that these depictions are changing. In 2007, the most downloaded image of a father was a dad playing football with his son. In 2015, the most downloaded image showed a dad reading a tablet with his daughter. They say a picture is worth a thousand words — and in an age where visuals are everywhere, it is so important to think about the messages those images are sending.” This link shares what role imagery in advertising can play, so that we can “be what we can see.”

It was reported in the UK that the so-called “tampon tax” (wherein sanitary protection products are taxed as a LUXURY item) is to be abolished and chef and campaigner Jamie Oliver came out swinging in favour of breastfeeding, saying that “we need to support the women of Britain to breastfeed more, anywhere they want to”, although he then ran into a wall of criticism, mostly from women who felt that it wasn’t down to a man to “mansplain” such a female function.

The Pool shared some revised ideas about what dressing for work now looks like and discussed how women’s wear has evolved over the last fifty years. And Lauren Laverne used the site to urge us all to speed up the pace of change.

Finally, books.

The Observer ran a nice piece on Caitlin Moran talking about her new book, Moranifesto and the same paper’s This Much I Know column featured feminist icon Gloria Steinem.

After the Last Dance by Sarra ManningI read and enjoyed After the Last Dance by Sarra Manning; it tells the story of Rose (set in 1940s’ wartime London) and the (initially unlikeable) current day Jane, slowly unfolding their connection. A beautiful woman in a wedding dress walks into a seedy bar in Las Vegas and asks the first man she sees to marry her; in 1943, Rose runs away from home and ends up in London where she volunteers at Rainbow Corner, a nightclub for American GIs. It’s a slow burning read but I enjoyed it – perfect for a rainy afternoon and a hot cross bun.

 

Thanks to Sphere and NetGalley for the chance to read After the Last Dance.

 

News round-up: Michelle Obama, women cricketers flying in economy and washing powder for men

News round-up: Michelle Obama, women cricketers flying in economy and washing powder for men

Michelle Obama at Mulberry School for Girls LondonAnother varied week in the global gender newsroom – here were just some of the stories which caught my eye.

As the Obama presidency comes to an end, the BBC used the occasion of International Women’s Day to examine Michelle Obama’s legacy. I think the fact that the word “legacy” is even being associated with the First Lady’s work is testament to her skills, smarts and passion to make the world a better place and not just be a passive partner or a clothes horse.

“It is her work on economic, social and racial inequality that most animates her and sets her apart. It is also this work, particularly the education of girls of colour in the United States and around the world, that is most likely to define her post-White House life.”

And still on the topic of FLOTUS, Nicholas Kristof noted in his weekly newsletter that:

“International Women’s Day came and went [this week], and it’s remarkable and reassuring to see how much more attention global women’s issues are getting. Michelle Obama has done a fine job promoting girls’ education, and President Obama says all the right things about how this is a security issue as well as a justice issue. But while the issues are getting more attention, they’re not getting adequate resources. President Obama promised when he was running for the White House in 2008 that he would start a $2 billion global education fund, and he never followed up — and it’s not as if Republicans have been interested either. One of my conclusions from spending a lot of time since 9/11 in conflict areas is that we overuse the military toolbox and underuse the education and women’s empowerment toolboxes. In short, educating girls and empowering women isn’t about helping half the population, but about helping everyone.”

Over in Turkey, The Observer’s Catherine Bennett dubbed President Recep Tayyip Erdoğan one of the world’s “greatest misogynists” in her article on Turkey potentially joining the EU.  And we learned of the female cricket team flying in economy whilst their male counterparts are up in what my former Australian colleagues used to refer to as “the pointy end of the plane” (business class).

The BBC shared an interesting trio of stories written by their pan-Asian team: the amazing adventures of ‘Sue in Tibet’ and her creator; how Indian women are fighting back against the prevailing preference for fair skin (as exemplified by the fact that every Indian cosmetics range has a skin lightening cream available, even ‘western’ brands like Clarins and L’Oréal) with the social media campaign which celebrates dark skin via hashtag #unfairandlovely; and a profile of Ladakh’s all women trekking company.

This year’s global teacher prize of $1 million was won by Hanan Al Hroub, who grew up in a Palestinian refugee camp and now is a teacher of refugees herself. She specialises in supporting children who have been traumatised by violence.

And this week’s #HeforShe hero is “Star Wars” director J.J. Abrams, who has announced that his production company, ‘Bad Robot’, now requires studios to submit female and minority candidates in proportion to their representation in the US population. Speaking at the New Work Summit conference, Abrams said the new hiring system is meant to increase diversity behind the scenes as well as in front of the camera. However, Fortune reported that a new survey finds that 67% of men believe “men and women have equal opportunities” in most workplaces. Not surprisingly, only 38% of women agree that’s the case.

Meanwhile, The Atlantic examined the USA gender pay gap, referencing that it’s now the narrowest it’s ever been, and yet it’s still 2.5 times the size of those of other industrialised countries – so they framed a few potential solutions.

I doubt that creating a washing powder aimed at men will help, but Leif Frey thinks that a new product (with a “cologne-inspired masculine fragrance of oak and musk”) will help break down stereotypes about who should do which household chores.

Stress Stricken Dad from man who has it allFinally, the ever on-point ManWhoHasItAll has a helpful recommendation as to how to break down structural inequalities – just smile!

I’m still #mindingthegap: a summary of recent activity on the #genderpaygap

I’m still #mindingthegap: a summary of recent activity on the #genderpaygap

Fawcett Soc_IWD  2016_01I’ll be speaking about the gender pay gap at an event kindly hosted by Soho House in London tomorrow night, where we’ll share the current figures, ably summarised by this Fawcett Society graphic (in a nutshell: the current UK gender pay gap is 13.9% and, at the current rate of progress, it will take us FIFTY YEARS to close it) and then discussing – what can both employers and members  of the workforce actually do to challenge the status quo, close the gap and, critically, achieve parity before we reach 2066?

(Or even, 2133, based on the ever-cheery World Economic Forum’s forecast of The Gap needing 118 years to be closed at a global level).

Ahead of my end-of-the-week report on the event, here’s a summary of the last time I spoke about the gender pay gap, and a reminder that it apparently starts with pocket money.

Since Beyoncé and I took to the stage at Shoreditch House last September, we have new legal reporting requirements in place,  as summarised here in an article written for the blog by an employment lawyer and expanded upon in greater detail,  from the point of view of the employer, by the Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development (CIPD).

There’s been a lot of news stories on the topic recently and I did a summary of them for you last month – here.

Gender pay gap (c) Matt Daily Telegraph Feb 2016I’ll close for now with another outing for my favourite #genderpaygap cartoon, © Matt and the Daily Telegraph … one picture, many words and a 13.9% gap.

And I look forward to meeting anyone who’s at the event tomorrow night- please feel free to ask questions, live Tweet us using hashtags #genderpaygap and/or #mindthegap and come and say ‘hello’ afterwards.

 

End of week round up – mostly celebrating #IWD2016

End of week round up – mostly celebrating #IWD2016

Overthrowing the patriarchyThis week,  it was pretty much all about International Women’s Day  on March 8th,  with lots of organisations using the event as a launch pad for their initiatives and announcements.  Here’s some of what caught my eye.

Back in 2008, I made a film called Closing the Gender Gap which featured the then deputy President of South Africa, Phumzile Mlambo-Ngcuka. She is now the executive director of UN Women and discusses in this Fortune interview  what International Women’s Day is all about. She had one very specific recommendation for how businesses of all sizes can help promote gender equality – clue: it involves money. And gaps. And here’s UN Women’s look at how IWD is celebrated around the world.

The ScotsWOMAN paper IWD 2016My absolute favourite story of the week (possibly the year, or maybe ever) was about newspaper The Scotsman becoming The ScotsWOMAN for the day, complete with an editorial mix which celebrated as well as analysed the social, economic, cultural and political achievement of women.

IWD quotationsNewly launched newspaper the New Day (which also happens to have a female editor, Alison Phillips) shared a graphic featuring some great quotes and also published (yet another) tool to cheer us all up by allowing us to calculate where we fall on the gender pay gap. Meanwhile, The Guardian suggested that we stop asking for parity with men and instead ask for progress – which, given that the International Labour Organization reported that women have seen only “marginal improvements” in the world of work in the past 20 years, is a very valid point.

The mostly female team behind the hit BBC  show ‘Call the Midwife’ reminded us that the show:

“… places women at the very centre of every episode, and women’s stories at the central part of our world. The role of women in the birthing room – and the positive aspect of female relationships seen more widely – has too often been invisible in popular culture. Yet the immense worldwide popularity of our programme demonstrates that our viewers, male and female, see this as a positive and natural thing for a drama to show. We hope there will come a time when it is so natural to drama that it does not require special mention – or indeed a special day in the calendar.”

The BBC also shared three stories as part of their IWD coverage: five pictures that revealed how women are treated around the world; England cricket vice-captain Heather Knight looked back at how far the women’s game has come; and here’s an interesting series of images of women making technology work for them.

However,  it wasn’t all good news; Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan – who has already enraged many by urging Turkish women to have at least three children and for calling efforts to promote birth control “treason”- said in his speech to celebrate IWD that he believes that “a woman is above all else a mother.”

Unesco reported, complete with some rather scary illustrations, that sexism and stereotyped language is rife in textbooks, whilst football club Wellingborough Town banned its chairman for making sexist remarks; perhaps he thought it was ‘banter’?

Nicholas Kristof (the ultimate champion of HeforShe, to my mind) commented on his Facebook page that:

“The group ONE has a new report noting that “poverty is sexist”–it absolutely is–and concluding that the worst places in the world to be born female are Niger, Somalia, Mali, CAR and Yemen. To me, the best index of global gender inequity is that there are still more males than females worldwide. Women live longer, so there should be more females. But because in so many places female foetuses are selectively aborted, or girls aren’t fed or vaccinated or taken to the doctor when sick, there are actually more males than females worldwide. And this can’t just be a women’s issue, but should be a men’s and women’s issue together!”

And the TUC issued a report which claims that women who have children before they are 35 take a 15% pay hit, compared with childless women. Other cheering data points include the fact that 20% of women under 25 were dismissed or forced out over pregnancy or maternity leave, compared to 10% of all mothers.

It’s the custom in many countries to present women with flowers on IWD – I was often given an individual rose on March 8th  when I worked in an office which had a large population of Russians, where IWD is also a public holiday. Perhaps it’s a shame that a bloke in Romania failed to remember the tradition, given his wife’s enraged reaction.

And finally,  for anyone in the mood for a Friday evening glass of wine,  The Guardian brought us the story of Italy’s first all-woman vineyard.  Saluti, cheers, sláinte, à votre santé, etc.

Did I miss anything? Please share stories or links in the comments below.

Have a great weekend – look out next week for a new #powerofthree interview with a woman who decided aged 11 that she wanted  to be a lawyer (spoiler alert: she made it!)

On #WomenandPower

On #WomenandPower

Hillary Clinton and PowerHillary Clinton is probably one of the most high profile and powerful women in the world at the moment, and is moving towards becoming America’s first ever female Presidential nominee. It is not, however,  the smooth path to the White House that she might (not unreasonably) have expected. Bernie Sanders crushed her in the recent New Hampshire primary—thanks in large part to female voters, 55% of whom say they voted for Sanders. The loss was undoubtedly a tough one for Clinton; she won the state in the 2008 race and it put her husband on the path to the White House in 1992. In her concession speech, Clinton looked forward, saying, “It is not whether you get knocked down that matters, it is whether you get back up.”

She subsequently won  major victories on ‘Super Tuesday’ in seven out of eleven Democratic primaries and caucuses, including Texas and Massachusetts. Her wins are credited to her popularity with minority voters and her kinship with Southern Democrats from the two decades she spent in Arkansas. There’s more on her campaign trail in this interesting piece from the BBC.

Elsewhere in the world, a new report suggests that women continue to face a double hurdle to gaining political power. While there has been an increase in women’s participation in politics across the globe, it has not necessarily resulted in an increase in their power and influence, a study by the Overseas Development Institute has found.

Although participation in political systems is a prerequisite for influence, women’s presence alone does not mean they have actual power or are able to make advances in gender equality. Women elected to public office are often seen as “troublemakers” and not “like other women”, are judged more harshly and can face violent backlashes for being politically active. The performance of individual women leaders can also affect public perceptions of the abilities of women in general.

Through interviews and observations in Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Malawi and Kenya researchers found numerous examples of where women have brought about positive changes through their involvement in male-dominated political and judicial systems. The report concludes that the major factors in women achieving real political power are (my italics) advances in education and technical knowledge, economic independence, feminist organisations and political skills, combined with changes in social structures and rules.

ODI research fellow Tam O’Neil said:

“Women have more rights and representation than ever before, with democracy and quotas as key drivers. But women leaders must be credible in the eyes of their, mostly male, peers to have real power – and this means having higher education, technical competence, and economic independence. Increased representation is a shallow gain unless women also have access to resources, and unless widespread beliefs about women’s role and capabilities change. Policy-makers need to pay more attention to these issues.”

Some of the report’s key findings include:

  • Village courts in Bangladesh now have at least one woman on all cases involving women and minors in project areas. However, social norms and structures prevent women from engaging in what are seen as male issues, such as land and property disputes.
  • In 2010, the women’s movement in Kenya succeeded in negotiating a constitution that was so progressive on gender issues that it was known as the ‘Women’s Constitution’. One of the key changes was a requirement that the Kenyan parliament include at least one third female representation.
  • Much of the backlash against increasing numbers of female Kenyan politicians is expressed through bullying, which is often sexual in nature. And even with increased representation in parliament, women remain a minority so must work hard to lobby male politicians to support legislation that treats men and women as equal.
  • An indication of the uphill struggle Kenyan female MPs face is the passing of a controversial marriage bill in 2014 which legalised polygamy.
  • A new survey of women MPs in Malawi shows that female candidates often face prejudice and gendered abuse during election campaigns. Once elected, women MPs can find it difficult to progress their own career or women’s rights in general. To be accepted by voters and keep their seat, MPs need to conform to expectations of a “good woman” in dress and behaviour. Women MPs however have worked in politically smart ways, using restrictive gender norms strategically to achieve rights and benefits for other women.
  • Women MPs made the case for a new Divorce, Marriage and Family Relations Act (2015) by appealing to male MPs as fathers, stressing the dangers of child marriage to girls. At the same time they did not draw attention to some of the more controversial provisions in the bill, such as those relating to marriage by repute, custody of children and marital rape.
  • Most Malawians have socially conservative views about women and gender relations. However, around half of the women MPs said they share domestic responsibilities, such as childcare and cooking, equally with their husband – showing the importance to women’s leadership of both women and men being prepared to challenge gender stereotypes.
  • In Afghanistan, the Ministry of Women’s Affairs, women activists and international actors lobbied for the law (2013) on the Elimination of Violence Against Women, which criminalised violence against women for the first time.

As the week of International Women’s Day draws to a close,  this report is a timely reminder of the gender based work still to be done and the power based progress still to be made in many countries around the world.

Celebrating #IWD2016

Celebrating #IWD2016

International Women’s Day is a global day which celebrates the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating gender parity and this year’s theme – #PledgeforParity – focuses on what can be done to increase and improve the pace of change. As the IWD site reminds us, we do indeed have much to celebrate today. But progress towards gender parity has slowed in many places and UN Women are using IWD to launch their Planet 50/50 by 2030 campaign.

Here in the UK, these graphics from the Fawcett Society serve as a timely reminder of how long, based on the current rate of progress, it will take to close the gender pay gap, improve women’s access to greater pension parity at retirement and have increased participation in certain job roles.

And, instead of speeding up progress, we actually seem to be slowing down:

“The World Economic Forum predicted in 2014 that it would take until 2095 to achieve global gender parity. Then one year later in 2015, they estimated that a slowdown in the already glacial pace of progress meant the gender gap wouldn’t close entirely until 2133. So how do we want to celebrate International Women’s Day 2016? We say by Pledging For Parity! Everyone – men and women – can pledge to take a concrete step to help achieve gender parity more quickly – whether to help women and girls achieve their ambitions, call for gender-balanced leadership, respect and value difference, develop more inclusive and flexible cultures or root out workplace bias. Each of us can be a leader within our own spheres of influence and commit to take pragmatic action to accelerate gender parity.”

(Source: IWD website)

So here are some resources that we can all use to make our own #PledgeforParity, as we all have a part to play when it comes to increasing the pace of change and progressing towards a more gender balanced world by 2030.

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I wrote last week about observing that L’Occitane are supporting women workers in Burkina Faso by donating the proceeds from one of their products to local NGOs. Perhaps, along with the commercial associations which are now part and parcel of supporting causes like breast cancer awareness, we are starting to see more companies supporting women through this type of model? At the weekend, I saw an editorial reference in my Sunday paper to an online dress boutique which is supporting domestic violence charity Refuge:

“Online frock mecca Little Black Dress has joined forces with charity Refuge, which helps women all over the country deal with domestic abuse. LBD has a range of gorgeous frocks and for every sale they will donate £1 to Refuge.”

The dresses in question seem to sell for around £100+ each, so to my mind, donating a quid isn’t overwhelmingly generous. However, perhaps they are a really high volume operation and sell hundreds of thousands of frocks each year, in which case, great; this £1-per-dress donation could make a real difference to the charity’s bottom line. Let’s hope so.

I also spotted, whilst on a recent trip to Sainsbury’s, that Taylors of Harrogate are doing their bit to support female coffee co-operative workers in Peru. They have launched a new ground coffee called Esperanza (after a female Peruvian coffee expert and the central Peruvian co-operative’s leader) and are working with a local NGO, Twin Trading. Taylor’s support will go:

“… towards interest-free microloans for women’s healthcare – hiring a doctor to visit and perform expensive, comprehensive procedures like haemoglobin checks, which can help to identify a range of conditions. The hope is that this will help to attract more women to join the committee and to become more active, in turn making it even stronger.

This premium is additional to the Fairtrade premium, which CAC Pangoa receives for all its Fairtrade coffee and cocoa since it became certified in 1999, and has helped to fund a raft of projects improving community healthcare, education and coffee tree replanting. Our Esperanza coffee is not going to fix the worldwide gender gap – but we hope it will be one more string to the bow of an inspiring coffee cooperative, and an equally inspiring woman who is leading the way for positive change.”

IWD 2016_Taylors Coffee picWhat a great idea. I bought two bags and I hope you’ll also check it out if you happen to see the coffee wherever you do your grocery shopping.

Happy International Women’s Day!