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On the gender pay gap: do you work for free?

31 Aug

Sometimes you meet someone and a throwaway remark turns into a full on conversation and a really solid connection.

Last year, I was at an event, got chatting and happened to mention the time at which I arrived at a very senior leadership team meeting (of twelve biased men and true) to present my deeply optimistic proposed diversity strategy, only to be greeted by the Chair with the profoundly unhelpful words:

“Here she is – it’s Diversity Barbie!”*

(* not the worst thing I’ve ever been called at work, but certainly not the best of gate openers, either).

My new friend suggested that it would be a great title for my memoir (I can see the pink cover now …) and thus was our connection forged.

We’ve kept in touch and a few weeks ago, I was delighted to be asked to join a panel that she’s convening to discuss the gender pay gap – coincidentally, a topic to which I’ve given a lot of thought of late, given the amount of recent press coverage discussing the issue. For instance, take a look at this article from The Atlantic, in which the idea that asking female interview candidates about their current salary point is mooted as an act of bias – does it have the (possibly unintentional) result of just further double glazing the glass ceiling of pay gaps?

(c) The Fawcett Society

(c) The Fawcett Society

Anyway, I’m looking forward to discussing this topic,  given that, as the Fawcett Society states, “the gender pay gap remains the clearest and most dramatic example of economic inequality for women today.”

The UK government is now pressing ahead with plans (or, as PM David Cameron rather lyrically put it, casting “sunlight on the discrepancies”)  to force large firms to disclose data on the gender pay gap among staff in companies with more than 250 employees;  the PM believes that this will eliminate the gender pay gap “within a generation.”

Which would be A Good Thing, when we consider that (all info below courtesy of the Fawcett Society‘s website) :

  • The UK passed equal pay legislation in 1970 and the USA in 1963 … but working women in the UK and the USA are still paid a fifth less than their male peers (22% in the UK, per The Guardian link above, or the equivalent of working for two hours a day FOR NOTHING);
  • 62% of those currently paid below the UK Living Wage (as at August 2015, £7.65 per hour) are women;
  • Primary causes of The Gap include – the motherhood penalty, leading a higher proportion of women to work in part-time, lower skilled roles due to childcare responsibilities. Then, on their return to work after a career break, reduced opportunities for career progression may force women to take up less senior and lower paid roles;
  • Occupational segregation – as the Fawcett Society confirms, “jobs traditionally done by women, such as cleaning and catering are typically undervalued and paid less than jobs traditionally done by men, such as construction and engineering. Women make up 78% of those working in the low paid sector roles of health and social care, whereas 88% of those working in the highly paid STEM industries, are men.” 
  • Outright discrimination – it’s been over forty years since the Ford machinists took the industrial action depicted in the film Made in Dagenham – but both direct and indirect discrimination still persists in the workplace.

I need to do more research, but I’m looking forward to the event next month.

And here’s my proposed mini bio:

“Cleo is a diversity and inclusion professional who maintains a successful senior corporate career alongside a freelance writing, blogging and social media habit at www.thegenderblog.com. She has worked for companies which include PricewaterhouseCoopers,  Credit Suisse, Australian engineering conglomerate WorleyParsons and AXA and is the recipient of a 2011 World of Difference award from the International Alliance of Women for her work in supporting the economic empowerment of women and girls around the world.

“She believes that impact is more important than intent, often wears pink and would like to ban the word “banter” in the workplace.” 

#WE: celebrating the Women’s Equality Party online today

19 Aug

WEP membership cardMy shiny new Women’s Equality Party “Founding Member” card arrived last week, just in time to join in today’s online celebrations for #WE and to get #WeAreWe and #WEPnesday trending.

The card arrived with a matching WEP sticker and we were asked to “put the sticker on your phone, take a picture in the mirror and post the picture on Twitter and Facebook as the clocks strike noon. If WE all post at the same moment – WE will be noticed!”

I have zero talent for taking selfies, with or without stickers, so I did my own take on the suggestion:

WEP launch selfieAnd indeed, we are being noticed – #WE is trending, alongside the announcement of the latest recruit to this year’s Strictly Come Dancing celebrity roster.

Great people to follow on Twitter for more WEP (@WEP_UK) details include founders @catherine_meyer, @sanditoksvig and leader @sophierunning – and there’s lots more detail about the WEP (the what and the why) on my blog post from last month and their website.

On ruling against banter

15 Aug

Professional contrarian Katie Hopkins is currently appearing on a little watched TV channel called TLC, sort-of-but-not-quite (because Mark Dolan is really doing it) hosting her own chat show called “If Katie Hopkins Ruled the World”. This rather laboured format sees Ms Hopkins and her guests propose assorted laws which they’d implement if they had the power to do so – thus, the studio audience can vote on such proposals as:  only men should propose marriage (to women), “if you’re not groomed, you’re doomed” and, a particular favourite of Katie’s, anything to do with being overweight, because she’d actually like to ban the existence of people with a BMI of 25+.

Along similar lines and when I was recently asked to draft my own updated 100 word bio in which I was asked to indicate a light hearted point of view, the idea that I would also like to ban Something came to me.

And the Thing that I would like to ban is the use of the word “banter” in the workplace – in one particular context.

I’m not in any way a killjoy and of course chat, wit and humour between peers is a great thing and is often what people miss when they move jobs, change offices or even work from home.

However.

My “gripe” is that is that the concept of “banter” is  often used as a dismissive term to disguise the fact that people use it as a shield to hide behind when they’re making remarks (at work, specifically but also in social media posts, emails, text messages or on a football pitch) which others may find offensive. So sexist, racist or homophobic comments are cloaked as “banter” and then when the recipient of said remark objects, they’re often told “it’s just a bit of banter” and are accused of having no sense of humour, taking themselves too seriously or (the horrors) being politically correct.

“Sheer bant”, as my friend’s teenage daughter refers to it, between friends/peers = no problem, but as a device to allow people to say what the hell they like to others and pass it off as “banter”? No.

And,  if we don’t hold people’s feet to the fire and call them out when they come out with utter rubbish and hastily re-badge it as “banter”,  how will we ever effect change in our language, customs and behaviours?

The People Stuff blog covered this from an HR perspective last year – take a look; Gemma makes a lot of sense.

(Image (c) @the100)

Banter_(c) @100

“Here’s the thing. Banter is never, ever a defence or an excuse for discrimination, bullying or harassment. Not in the employment tribunal, not anywhere. … Instead of the banter justification, I would instead advocate using the complete pillock defence. As in admitting you have behaved like one. Followed by a grovelling apology. You can’t undo harassment or bulling once it has taken place. But you can avoid pointless legal expense, or the implication that you just don’t care about equality, by leaving this particular word where it belong. With The Inbetweeners.” 

#WE: I’m in.

27 Jul

#WEP logoTo possibly the surprise of, oh, pretty much nobody,  I’ve just joined the newly-minted Women’s Equality Party as a founder member. After a year out of work,  I haven’t yet started earning again (that comes next week,  when I start my new job)  but somehow,  paying to support and join a party which has women’s equal participation as its sole manifesto feels likes something that I want to do now that I’m in a position to do so. I felt so frustrated and disillusioned with the way in which the main political parties approached gender issues during the most recent UK election that being a positive part of a different way forward feels like something that I can really get behind.

One of the things that I didn’t predict happening when I moved out of London in 2013 was how very isolated I would feel, politically. I’ve gone from living in one of the most diverse cities in the world, in a Labour held constituency with female and Asian candidates on not only my own constituency’s candidate list but also on the lists of the adjacent constituencies,  to being an invisible resident in a location where every single candidate who was fielded here on May 7th 2015 was a white man.  My general voting approach,  if I’ve been after a tactical plan rather than voting for the majority candidate,  has been to consider voting for the female candidate on the docket – but here,  for the first time in my entire voting life that I can remember,  there was no female.  I did get quite excited when I saw that the Labour candidate was called Kim – but no, Kim was a bloke too. I did vote for him,  as it happens,  along with a few hundred others but it made no difference,  either to Kim, the constituency profile or of course,  the majority Government.

So. A new way forward.  Although I loathe everything they stand for,  UKIP have shown us that being a single issue party can be a platform on which to build success and a profile and what could be a bigger single issue than bringing about more equality for 51% of the population?

Repeat after me: “Women are not a minority …”

Here’s the link to the BBC story on the party being set up by Sandi Toksvig in May. And here’s the #WE party objectives:

Our objectives

#WE are pushing for equal representation in politics, business, industry and throughout working life. 

#WE are pressing for equal pay and an equal opportunity to thrive. 

#WE are campaigning for equal parenting and caregiving and shared responsibilities at home to give everyone equal opportunities both in family life and in the work place. 

#WE urge an education system that creates opportunities for all children and an understanding of why this matters.  #WE strive for equal treatment of women by and in the media. 

#WE seek an end to violence against women.

Supporting Plan

7 Jul

Plan_talks_Sticker_logoLast week, Plan contacted me and asked if I’d be interested in working with them to provide blogging and social media support for their campaigns to support girls around the world. Apparently,  they want someone who writes about  “… life, money, girls with a healthy dose of humour …” and so it seems that I fit the bill! More importantly, I’m a long standing supporter of their work and have blogged and attended events about it before: when I raised over £300 to support their “Girls’ Night In” campaign in 2009;  at the launch of the Plan book, “Because I Am a Girl” in January 2010 and then a few months later at their International Women’s Day event at the House of Commons. It seems that I’ve just missed their event featuring Angelina Jolie and William Hague, but I’ve been invited along to learn more about their plans and how they’d like to use social media to raise awareness: so that’s where I’ll be on Tuesday afternoon. This workshop will be followed by a “Plan Talks” event featuring their long term supporter, author and broadcaster Kathy Lette,  who I remember as being fabulous at the book launch event four years ago. I’ll write about that later this week.

The Return

7 Jul

It’s been a while (understatement of 2014) since I’ve blogged,  as somehow,  life and a Really Big Corporate job got in the way. Lots of things have changed for me and in the wider world since I last updated here, but my interest in and passion for all matters gender related has remained steadfast and, now that the RBC job has gone away through redundancy (the fools!), I’m keen to re-discover my blogging mojo.

Since I last blogged,  here’s what’s changed for me:

  • australian_flag_3The Really Big Corporate Job: it came and it went but I made some amazing new colleagues and friends and travelled to work and speak in Australia, Singapore, Dubai, the USA and Canada. I broadened my knowledge of a whole new corporate sector (engineering) and learned and shared about diversity and inclusion across a broader plain than just gender. Specifically, because I was working for an Australian company,  I learned a lot about indigenous Australians, the history of their treatment in Australia and how things are now (not great, but better, in part thanks to Australian NGOs like CareerTrackers, with whom I was privileged to work over the last few years). I really recommend John Pilger’s book “A Secret Country” for more on the disgraceful way indigenous Australians (and particularly women) have been treated throughout history – believe me when I say that at times it has rivalled the South African apartheid model.
  • I moved house: this time last year, TLS and I put our much loved London house up for sale and, in October 2013, moved 103 miles south west to a little town where we are now building a new life in a new community. I can’t lie: it’s been hard to arrive somewhere  where you know no-one, and, because I was either working from home or away on business,  I didn’t have the ready-made office network of colleagues with whom to interact. But, we are slowly getting there and making new friends, getting to know the area and really loving our new house. I’ve just about got used to the fact that I can’t get a manicure at the top of the road anymore and I have finally discovered a very good coffee place in the local town. Skinny flat white, please.
  • I lost weight: just under 100 pounds (or c. 45 kgs if that’s your unit of choice). Also not easy but,  as with moving house,  very worthwhile and I certainly feel far happier and more healthy now. I’ve also started noticing an odd thing when I read articles and interviews with female celebrities – they ALWAYS mention what they eat in the article. Food always crops up, even in pieces published in my much loved Observer. Yesterday’s paper had a “This Much I Know” interview with former Pussy Cat Doll/X Factor judge Nicole Scherzinger in which she mentioned that the things she misses about England are “… Percy Pigs and … fish and chips …”. Really? Male subjects of the weekly column never seem to feel the need to reference this sort of stuff: I wonder why?

Things that have stayed the same:

  • Still an avid reader: nearly 500 books read on my Kindle since I first acquired one;
  • Still devoted to The Observer, above comment notwithstanding;
  • Still passionate about India and determined to finish my book about women in India.

Today’s last words come from the marvellous Katharine Whitehorn,  as shared in her recent “Life Class” column in The Observer of 29th June:

“I can’t remember the name of the woman who recently said she couldn’t be a feminist because she thought men were splendid – which is just as well, or she might wish to sue me for what I feel like saying about her. How often does it have to be said: feminism is not about hating men. It’s about wanting the same rights, chances and privileges that men have – things like decent chances of promotion at work and equal pay for equal work and being taken seriously about sexual harassment.

 “It’s worth remembering not just that we once couldn’t vote but that a woman couldn’t get a mortgage without a male sponsor. Even banks have now recognised that women make not only money but their own decisions. What serious feminists worry about is the chances that girls never get, like those denied education in Pakistan or Nigeria, where a child is automatically of its father’s religion, not its mother’s.”

Why women? A few suggestions

17 Oct

Yes – still here,  still blogging and prompted to do so again by noting that there’s a link to the Gender Blog on my new employer’s intranet – so hello, new colleagues from the Women Professionals Portal!

Here I am in my new hard hat,  as handed out during induction on Day One a couple of weeks ago.

My next post will be about what I’ve been up to in recent months but here in the interim is a useful reminder,  courtesy of Forbes Women, as to the value women bring to leadership positions.

List compiled by Magus Consulting.

• “…. Companies with three or more women in senior management functions score more highly on average (on nine dimensions of company excellence). It is notable that performance increases significantly once a certain critical mass is attained, namely, at least three women on management committees for an average membership of 10 people. “ (Women Matter, McKinsey 2007)

• “Fortune 500 companies with the highest representation of women board directors attained significantly higher financial performance, on average, than those with the lowest representation of women board directors.” (Catalyst, October 2007)

• “A selected group of companies with a high representation of diverse board seats (especially gender diversity) exceeded the average returns of the Dow Jones and NASDAQ Indices over a 5 year period.” (Virtcom Consulting)

• “An extensive 19-year study of 215 Fortune 500 firms shows a strong correlation between a strong record of promoting women into the executive suite and high profitability. Three measures of profitability were used to demonstrate that the 25 Fortune 500 firms with the best record of promoting women to high positions are between 18 and 69 percent more profitable than the median Fortune 500 firms in their industries.” (European Project on Equal Pay and summarized by researcher Dr. Roy Adler in Miller McCune).

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